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Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)
on here, willie? >> they didn't break any new foreign policy ground, that was clear, in terms of the questioning. so then you're left to wonder what was going on there? what was the idea? although it was remarkable to see the two of them sitting together if you thought about where we were five years ago and them saying shame on you and you're likeable enough. >> you're a racist. >> andrea mitchell, am i being too cynical this morning? because these are two people i respect a great deal. >> a great deal. >> well, it was sort of -- as you're pointing out, it was really unusual to see them together. and to see the relationship that they have developed, i think that they have developed a close relationship. i was really intrigued by when he -- when steve kroft asked about what about the staffs, and they acknowledged it took longer for their staffs to get over the hurt and anger after the campaign, and i would say still hasn't happened, exactly. because she has been the most celebrated secretary of state and certainly the most high-profile member of the cabinet. and gets along very
not talk about the foreign policy, they did not even have a positive economic plan. they said it will be a referendum on an unsatisfactory referendum -- unsatisfactory performance of the incumbent. the stock market was stronger. it was just good enough to drag president obama across the finish line. i think there's plenty to look at. there are plenty of problems. project orca, the get-out-the- vote project. the message is much too limited, too smug, too assumed that people would reject liberal policies because we said they were liberal. the failure to provide a positive reforming conservative agenda. where was the romney health care plan, the positive plan, not just or peeling -- repealing obamacare? i do think scott walker, sam brownback, bob jindal, that is where you alcee conservative principles govern. in washington, a half to boast -- both oppose the obama administration, collaborate, and in the house, they have to figure out what it means to the beat -- to be the majority of one body of congress while the presidency and other house and congress is held by the other party
hearing these. >> if she wants this job, it will be interesting. on foreign policy, president obama defending himself from critics who say the u.s. has not been aggressive enough in using american power abroad. >>> well, moammar gadhafi probably does not agree with that assessment, or at least if he were around he would not agree with that assessment. when it comes to egypt, if it had not been for the leadership we showed, you might have seen a different outcome there. but also understanding that we do nobody a service when we leap before we look. here is a classic example of where our involvement, we want to make sure that not only does it enhance u.s. security but also that it is doing right by the people of syria and neighbors like israel that are going to be profoundly affected by it. and so it's true sometimes that we don't just shoot from the hip. >>> secretary clinton's last day at the state department will be this friday. >>> we have new developments on immigration reform. a bipartisan group of eight senators say they've reached an agreement on sweeping legislation that incl
the neoconservative phase of the republican party as far as foreign policy goes. most republicans in the senate and the house, like the american people, are exhausted by 10, 11, 12 years of war. obviously, john mccain and lindsey graham are on the forefront and have shaped republican foreign policy for a few years. certainly john mccain has. he is in a shrinking minority. and it's shrinking very quickly. and i suspect you're going to see a return to the realism of colin powell of dr. brzezinski, of brent scowcroft, of george h.w. bush, of the republicans who helped us and democrats who helped us through that approach when the cold war. >> and this is the post-superpower era, where there has to be some pulling back, and david said it exactly right. >> i wouldn't say post-superpower. you're right, it's a new era. it's much more indirection in our application of power. the neocons are for direct use of power. this will have to be more indirect. >> and there may be surprises there, as always is the case. look at what happened with algeria and mali. >> dr. zbigniew brzezinski, dad, thanks for not wa
-- and so you've had a lot to say about foreign policy. you've also had a thing or two to say about the republican position on taxes and a number of other issues. so i wonder, is your view that republicans need to get right on foreign policy and can that that is really a core issue that's affecting everything else, or do you see that fundamentally as a garnish on the salad, something maybe we ought to -- a nice to have, not an essential? >> you know, i think we need as a party to have -- i won't try to say his last name because i always butcher it myself -- i think we need john and bill need that wing of the party, but we also need realists that acted and thought and saw the world like we with did when we were in congress in the 1990s, when we controlled congress from '94 on where we believe inside a restrained foreign policy. .. as long as republicans have a coherent foreign policy, i think americans will go along with it. i think our bigger problem from the bush era came from the fact he's a big government republican. he came in with $155 billion surplus. when you left we had a tr
the republicans on a whole host of issues including republican staple issues like taxes and foreign policy she does better. it's not enough to go into communities they've ignored or tinker with their message. they have to take a hard look at policies they've embraced, like self-deportation for immigration reform. i don't care how you spin that, hispanics are not going to embrace you if you have a policy like that in your party. >> rick: ron? >> i have to tell you i think president obama is going to help republicans out because he's now unveiled a liberal agenda that, since he has been reelected, surprise, surprise and republicans will be able to contrast themselves as a much morecentric party than the president is going, way left and i think on issues like, climate change, on spending, on, you know, creating a culture of dependence on the federal government, we can help to drive a wedge between senate democrats who are in red states up in 2004, we can drive a wedge between them and focus first on getting back the senate before we go after the presidency. >> rick: doug, what about that? this wa
to one another must be equally as well. >> reporter: foreign policy was noticeably absent from his address though he harolded a decade of war, touting a recovering economy and acknowledged the lessons still ahead. >> the commitments we make to each other, these things do not sap our nation. they strengthen us. >> reporter: he gave mitt romney this line. >> they do not make us a nation of tears. ♪ la >> reporter: filling the air what patriotism, kelly clarkson and beyonce. ♪ the brave there was a poem and prayers. as he left the west front of the capitol, a nostalgic turned back toward the lincoln memorial. >> i want to take a look out one more time. >> now there were shades of the campaign that the president winning out, success can't mean that a few people are making it and a growing number are barely scratching by. the president acknowledging that bipartisan -- or the lack of bipartisanship here in washington but noted that everyone needs to work together for the good of the country. john? >> dan, that moment at the end of your piece where the president turned around and look
for the president's pick as the new secretary of state with foreign policy hot spots around the world. only getting hotter. tonight on "special report," we will look at the channels awaiting senator kerry if as expected he is confirmed next week. kerry faced mostly friendly questioning during today's session. the current secretary of state is criticized for a lack of consistency in her statements wednesday about last year's libya terror attack. we'll go over some of the inconsistencies tonight. brit hume will have analysis of clinton's tenure. wheels are in motion for women to serve on the front line of combat position. the change was officially announced today. does president obama really want to annihilate the republican party in "special report" from washington starts at 6:00 eastern. now back to new york and my colleagues with "the five." ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> greg: disgusting. >> dana: you're disgusting. >> greg: that is a sick song. >> dana: can i do my segment? we're going to talk about you. soda ban about to go in effect in new york city but has new opposition that used to be for it. they were
. very knowledgeable about foreign policy. he is a, wish there were a better term for this, he's a social conservative. that term will have to do. and he's a hell of a guy. ladies and gentlemen, the new senator from texas, our, and capital r, rafael ted cruz. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> thank you so much. jay has been a dear friend a long, long time. i told jay please -- you know this past week was a momentous week -- oh, i need a mike? hello, hello. >> as they said in the 20 70 campaign, help is on the way. [laughter] so when the mike wasn't working i told all sorts of embarrassing secrets about jay nordlinger and i trust all of you got them in full lurid detail. this past week has been a momentous week. president obama was sworn in to a second term. i guess what made the news is beyonce apparently lip synced throughout the inaugural. not as widely reported was the fact that president obama did as well. who knew that his teleprompter could play music? we saw this week an ode to liberalism,
. >> cenk: will it have ramifications for israel's foreign policies especially with iran. >> the whole region is in turmoil, as we know. so the challenges to israel and to the entire mildews is front and center and will be on the agenda. these elections were in a strange way about coalition of israel. >> cenk: help me make sense of them. israel must at least get rid of the palestinians and put a frequence between us. how do you read that. >> i can't vouch for the quote but there is a desire and consensus to create a two-state solution, two states for two peoples. that consensus has been enduring for several years now and any israeli government will reflect that in the call political politically and officially is to reenter negotiations discussing and reinstating two-states. >> cenk: quote, it may be true that the humane thing is to remove the roadblocks and checkpoints, to stop the occupation immediately to, enable the palestinians freedom of movement of the territories and to tear down the bloody inhumane wall, to promise human rights to every individual. it's just that i will end up
administration's foreign policy and i urge his sped deacon firm mags. >> before leaving, just like her first day on the job four years ago -- >> i am absolutely honored and thrilled beyond words to be here with you. >> clinton is likely to say good-bye to the diplomat she's led and deliver a major speech on international policy. but her last days as america's high-flying top diplomat have been overshadowed by nearly a month of illness, the fallout over the deadly attack in benghazi. >> i think it's inexcusable that you did not know about this and that you did not read these cables. >> and her impassioned defense. >> what difference at this point does it make? it is our job to figure out what happened. >> i don't think it will be part of her legacy. >> beyond benghazi, former secretary of state madeleine albright says clinton did something big for america's foreign policy. >> i think she will be valued greatly for finding other parts than just military power for america the way that we use our influence. >> others, while praising clinton personally, charge the administration she's part of, failed
is that republicans need to get right on foreign policy and that is a core issue that is affecting everything else? are you seeing it as a garnish on the salad? not essential. >> as a party, we need to have john and bill on that wing of the party. we also need those who acted and soggy world like we did -- and saw the world like we did in congress or we believed in a restrained foreign policy. that is part of the balance. did you go back and look at what william buckley said about iraq. he said it was not a conservative of venture. there's nothing conservative about believing that you're going to be able to change the way people live and think in other countries that do not have a democratic background. i think the bigger problem really has to duet the domestic side of things. as long as republicans have a coherent foreign policy, i think americans will go along with its. the bigger problem from the bush era came that he was a big government republican. we had $155 billion surplus when he came in. when you that we had a $1 trillion deficit. our national debt doubled. we had a seven million-dollar
justice. dr. king was a fierce critic of foreign policy in the vietnam war. in his beyond vietnam speech, which he delivered at the york's riverside church, 1967, a year before the day he was assassinated, dr. king calledll the united states the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today. "time" magazine called the speech demagogic slander that sounded like a script for radio hanoi. today, we let you decide. we play an excerpt of dr. king's speech, beyond vietnam. >> after 1954, they watched us conspire to prevent elections which could have surely brought ho chi minh to power over the united vietnam and they realized they had been did -- betrayed again. when we asked why they do not leap to negotiate, these things must be remembered. also it must be clear that the leaders of hanoi considered the presence of american troops in support of the diem regime to have been the initial military breach of the geneva agreements concerning foreign troops. and they remind us that they did not begin to send troops in large numbers and even supplies, and to the south, until american forces had mo
have to say this is an area where the obama administration foreign policies has not been successful. just to come back for a moment to the question of terrorism. i thought senator feinstein said something really important on your show when she talked about the need to reach out and form a broad coalition that would include russia, that would include china, that would include other nations that care about this new morphing, evolving, fragmented al qaeda. that's what george bush and george tenet did in 2001. they went knocking on every door around the world, every security service that faced a danger and said let's work together. let's figure out ways to share information, money if needed. and i heard senator feinstein saying let's do that again, and i thought it was a really good idea. >> schieffer: stephanie, what do you think? how do you see this administration now over these next four years? we heard the president's speech you talked about how, you know, he did lay out his priorities. but what's really important to them? what do you think they'll concentrate on? >> well, i think m
. a lot of foreign policy experience and not a lot of domestic policy experience. how do you read the announcement? >> he has jack lew. he has joe biden to send up for the all-important relationships on capitol hill. i think this was a legacy pick. the president now has as we know an ambitious agenda that he laid out in the inaugural address. the question is, who is going to protect those goals from him? it's someone he has been with ever since his federal public life has started. that's mcdonough. this is somebody he trusts to protect not just himself. not just the staff, but to move that legacy and the obama era sooner or later will come to an end. the president clearly wants to make the major shape now. i think that's why he picked this man he trusts and has known for so long. >> john kerry ends before the senate foreign relations committee and he will be confirmed. i don't think there is any doubt about that. chuck hagel, that could be a little bit more. >> i think they will rough him up and be more lively than the john kerry hearings. in the end, the numbers. once senator sch
what they think about it and all the power vacuums created by our foreign policy lately are not clearly prepared to keep the peace when we get involved in the arab spring. my point to mr. nixon this isn't the nobel gee we think you are pretty swell award it should go to the christian and muslim leaders in nigeria who are working to bridge the police there. political dissidents in cuba and russia. people doing real on-the-groundwork. so lazy to give it to hillary clinton. just lazy. >> garland, what do you think. >> if the republicans had v. spent one/1,000th of the energy benghazi thinkingalling l figuring out whether there was weapons of mass destruction in iraq as opposed to four in benghazi. >> i do want to bring in, i threw this out in the twitter world in the facebook world and we got a huge response. people very opinionated about whether or not this should happen. one of those responses, mike, sanveri if alfred nobel knew how politicized his peace prize had become he would be rolling in his grave the entire panel has become a farce. s is it too politicized, mike? >> it's almost as
it a foreign policy of hope and change. a change, and you let it happen and you hope it works out. you hope the secularists, when in actuality we know who's filled that vacuum it's been al-qaeda, and from libya and syria trying to take down the regime in egypt. in algeria, mali, across the board they're on the roll and this administration refuses to acknowledge it it. >> brian: what's interesting, whether you agree with president bush or not, he had a freedom agenda, would put advisors on the ground or domestic forces and go in there in quick strike operations. what is this president's mission, is it all about drones with hell-fire missiles? >> it seems like, afghanistan we're headed for the exits even sooner than he talked about on the campaign trail. he's got the quote, flexibility for the second term. i think he believes that with drone strikes and special operators he can affect things enough and anybody who's been on the ground knows it's intelligence on the ground, relationships, even if it's not a massive war front bilike iraq or afghanistan, it's events on the ground that affect not
's foreign policy. the foreign policy is what difference does it make? hey, what difference does it make if we give our sworn enemies, people who want to wipe israel and us off the map, so we give them the method to wipe them out? what's the big deal? >> brian: what do you say to people who say hue bark wasn't a benevolent dictator even though he was good to us. should we have not been giving egypt aid all those years? >> we were not interfering with the internal situation in these countries, but mubarak had agreements with this country. this administration throws our allies under the bus. they've done it with the northern alliance that fought the taliban in afghanistan. they did it with poland. we'd deal with them for defensive weapons. they've done it repeatedly and as a west african told me when i was over there a couple of years ago, he said, we were so excited when you elected a black president. but please, tell people in washington stop getting weaker. the world sees you getting weaker! don't do that. you put us in jeopardy. we're putting ourselves in jeopardy when we're sending je
and then we talk about our wonderful foreign policy. >> gretchen: she did talk about the fact that she did believe that the world was a more dangerous place now than ever before. but that was in the second part of the interview. the first part of the interview before the commercial break was talking about the relationship between president obama and mrs. clinton. i want now listen to this and then get your reaction. >> i just want to have a chance of to publicly say thank you 'cause i think hillary will go down as one of the finest secretary of states we have. >> after i ended my campaign, i immediately did everything i could to help the president get elected because despite our hard fought primary, we had such agreement on what needed to be done for our country. >> it made for tough debates. >> it did. >> we could never figure out what we differed on. >> yeah. we worked at that pretty hard. >> i consider hillary a strong friend. >> very warm, close. i think there is a sense of understanding that sometimes doesn't even take words because we have similar views. we have similar experiences t
on two less obvious facets of foreign policy, the earnvinement and his economy and talked about the u.s. putting its own fiscal house in order to be a leader on the world stage. kerry, a long-time clean energy advocate says it is a $6 trillion market worth millions of american jobs and we need to get in the game. >> the solution of climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues. >> he was less committal about whether he would approve the keystone pipeline because it would cross the border between the u.s. and canada. kerry is expected to get a positive recommendation from the committee and if you will confirmation from the full senate next week. back with more bill press after the break. stay with us. alright, in 15 minutes we're going to do the young turks. i think the number one thing that viewers like about the young turks is that we're honest. they know that i'm not bs'ing them with so
is an expert when it comes to foreign policy and international affairs. he broke some eggs over there in those particular institutions. so he's no pushover, but i think the most important thing here is exactly what you noticed. and that is that relationship. we are starting the second term of the obama administration, believe it or not, time is short before people begin to turn to the future. right now, yes, the president is working for the country, et cetera, et cetera, but this is also about legacy. i think this is a legacy chief of staff pick. this is somebody who has been with him from the -- been with the president from the beginning of his federal office days, when he was a senator-elect, first met, et cetera. so he's been there from the beginning. he has the president's back. the president understands that. this is someone i think the president is entrusting, not just with the staff at the white house and all the things that come with that chief of staff role, but also with the obama era as it will, at some point the obama era will be written up and so much of what -- we can tell from t
the democrats lost power in 1980, i became completely responsible on foreign policy, completely. when they were in power, they had to deal with the soviets. carter was weak, but when the soviets invaded afghanistan, he had the boycott, the olympic boycott. and he toughened up. one of the things he proposed was that the germans had wanted the americans to develop a neutron bomb. but instead, carter didn't want to do that. so he proposed to put in germany and in britain short range -- medium-range nuclear weapons as an answer to the soviets who had put medium weapons in eastern europe. that was a carter administration policy. reagan comes in in 1981 and democrats completely collapse. >> i was a speechwriter in 1980. i had nothing to do with him in 1984. but he and gary hart ran together to see who was the first to have been forced the nuclear freeze, which was the stupidest idea in the history of the nuclear age. i joined the new republican in 1981 on inauguration by the way. i wrote an editorial denouncing the freeze as an illusion and deception, which incidentally caused the most canceled subsc
a foreign policy that can doing development as well as diplomacy that can reach out to women's groups, to youth, to entrepreneurs, to religious groups. that's the softer side. but it's also the smart side. and it's not john kerry's natural bailiwick, but it's very important that he build on that legacy. >> i take it that state department will be much different under kerry. and marie slaughter, thank you very much for joining us. >> thank you. >>> a woman accused of stabbing her boyfriend more than 20 times is claiming self-defense. it's one of the hottest trials going on right now. we'll dig deeper on the jodi arias trial with hln's jane velez-mitchell just ahead. >> one day when he drove home from a little league game, i saw a homeless man with a cardboard sign that said "need a meal." so i told my mom i wanted to do something. >> will larsy is a 9-year-old child. i hesitate to call him child. i think he's in a category of his own. as a 7-year-old, he decided he was going to take on this issue of hunger. >> welcome to frogs. >> my group is called frogs and it means friends reaching o
where were the tough questions about global hot spots and our foreign policies. let's talk about it with jim pinkerton a contributing editor and writer for the american conservative magazine. alan colmes host of the alan colmes radio show and author of thank the liberals for saving america. welcome to both of you. steve croft said it in the intro he said we barely had enough time to scratch the surface of their complicated relationship. jim, assess what scratching they did? >> no scratching whatsoever, that is for sure. every journalist has to make a choice. if you want the interview you sometimes have to take the terms that the interviewee wants whether the termser explicit or implicit. when oprah winfrey be began to interview lance armstrong. was tough question, tough question, tough question, a tough interview at least the first half. steve croft has set himself up for puff tee interviews with the obama administration. it was quite striking. ron forneau of the national journal said the president and mrs. clinton were like an old married couple, happily sitting there and happil
administration. second term. >> foreign policy is your expertise. three weeks ago we would not have thought of africa being a threat to americans. what concerns you about that situation? what can the president do about going forward? >> i think if we're talking about mali and places around mali, the president should support those who are going to lead the french. the french have a unique relationship and interest in mali. i think we should support them to the extent we can. they're one of our nato allies and they have been a friend of ours. but we have to keep our eye on the places. i don't think it will require american soldiers on the ground, but we have to realize that al qaeda has been badly diminished. let's not overlook the success we have had. but it doesn't mean it's gone away. and it doesn't mean that every al qaeda cell is getting ready to attack the united states of america. they're doing other things in the region as well. so be vigilant. help our friends. i don't think there's a need for a commitment of american troops. >> mr. secretary, thank you so much for being with us. as
and nuclear test. let's bring in our expert now of foreign defense policy at the american enterprise institute. michael, let's just go here. so is kim jong-un, if he is trying to prove that he is not afraid of the big bad wolf, that being the u.s. or is this another attention grabber? what is it that he wants from the united states? take any money, because it's not going to get it. >> yesterday shown that he is not afraid by launching his missile in december. and also china before that back in april. i'm not so sure why north korea is upset about this. it's empty and it doesn't do anything but previous extender thing. there is no reason to do so. they are not doing anything about the north korean provocations. >> this guy has to raise his own head and try to get some attentions. let's talk about the people that might be watching. japan is right there and we are talking about proximity. we are talking about how much attention they can get. they are hoping for a response. then there is china who is north korea's major ally in terms of diplomacy. but china is now saying that kim jong-un is backin
spending. this has been a big foreign policy week in washington. and i'm wondering, given what we've learned about al qaeda and its resurgence in north africa and just defense posture globally, david, do you have a sense of what ryan is thinking about defense spending these days? >> no, i don't, particularly with regard to ryan, but i think it's such an important point, gene, because the threat from northern africa alone, listen to secretary clinton's testimony beyond what went into the benghazi attack or what information was missed. the need to fortify our missions and installations and consulates and embassies around the globe. and to the extent that we're going to have an aggressive posture to deal with an al qaeda 3.0 around the globe or failing states, if that comes to pass in afghanistan, there are real concerns that a lot of people have about the united states right now. to say nothing of all of the costs related to our returning soldiers and the sort of care that they're going to need. >> you know, what's so fascinating, steve rattner, talking about the debate, i'm actuall
's a sign that we now depend on ongoing financial assistance from foreign countries to finance our government's reckless fiscal policies. leadership means that the buck stops here. instead, washington is shifting the burden of bad choices today on the backs of our children and grandchildren, therefore intend to oppose the effort to increase america's debt limit. in 2008, candidate obama blamed president bush and called the growing debt unpatriotic. >> number 43 added 4 trillion dollars by his lonesome so that we now have over 9 trillion dollars of debt that we are going to have to pay back, $30,000 for every man, woman and child, that's irresponsible. it's unpatriotic. >> mike: unpatriotic. 9 trillion dollars in debt 2008. we're 16 1/2 trillion dollars in debt today. all right. joining me now, former house speaker newt gingrich. mr. speaker, great having you with me tonight. [applause] >> good to be with you, governor. i must say that was a terrific lead-in and one i kind of wish the president had seen. >> mike: well, i want to begin asking you, does it strike you as odd? the medi
can't pay its own bills, it's a sign that we now depend on ongoing financial assistance from foreign countries to finance our government's reckless fiscal policies. leadership means that the buck stops here. instead, washington is shifting the burden of bad choices today on the backs of our children and grandchildren, therefore intend to oppose the effort to increase america's debt limit. in 2008, candidate obama blamed president bush and called the growing debt unpatriotic. >> number 43 added 4 trillion dollars by his lonesome so that we now have over 9 trillion dollars of debt that we are going to have to pay back, $30,000 for every man, woman and child, that's irresponsible. it's unpatriotic. >> mike: unpatriotic. 9 trillion dollars in debt 2008. we're 16 1/2 trillion dollars in debt today. all right. joining me now, former house speaker newt gingrich. mr. speaker, great having you with me tonight. [applause] >> good to be with you, governor. i must say that was a terrific lead-in and one i kind of wish the president had seen. >> mike: well, i want to begin asking you, does it st
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)